Archive for the 'Humanities Salon' Category

Reminder: The City of Rome, From caput mundi to mirror of princes and beyond

The Sydney Humanities Salon, in conjunction with Sydney Ideas, will be running the last of its series on ancient cities on Tuesday evening.  All welcome. No need to RSVP.

Venue: Sydney Law School foyer, Eastern Avenue, Camperdown Campus.
Time: 6.00pm to 7.30pm

Ancient Cities: The city of Rome: From caput mundi to mirror of princes and beyond
21 June, 2011
Dr Paul Roche
This lecture will trace both the urban development of the city of Rome and some of the ways ancient Romans thought about their city from the period of late republic (second century BC) to the early empire (first century AD). This was a period of radical change, which saw the physical transformation of the city from something of a diplomatic embarrassment to the glittering capital of a Mediterranean world empire (‘beggaring description and never again to be imitated by mortal men’ as a late eye-witness puts it). This metamorphoses was accompanied by a shift in the way urban development itself was conceived, from a concept with limited horizons beyond the unit of the building itself to a more explicit concern with moving people through larger, consolidated units of urban space. Rome’s topography was intrinsic to her politics, culture, religion and self-definition; a theme tracked in this lecture is how the city offered itself as a metaphor or a mirror: of family (self-) esteem, of world empire, of the emperor’s image and his care for his people, and of the care for the individual human soul.

Enquiries to salon@sydney.edu.au

Read the University’s news story on the talk here

Humanities Salon Ancient cities series: Carthage, Athens, Rome

The Sydney Humanities Salon, in conjunction with Sydney Ideas, will be running a series of three talks on the ancient cities of Carthage, Athens and Rome. All welcome. No need to RSVP.

Venue: Sydney Law School foyer, Eastern Avenue, Camperdown Campus.

Time: 6.00pm to 7.30pm

Cathage

Monday 23 May, 2011

Dr Richard Miles

In 146 BC, after three protracted and bloody wars, the city of Carthage was finally captured by the Roman legions. In an infamous act of ruthless brutality Carthage was razed to the ground and a curse placed against any future attempts to settle on the site of the city. Yet just a century and half later, the emperor Augustus re-built Carthage as the new capital of the Roman province of Africa. In this session I will explore the extent to which the memory of Carthage as Rome’s greatest and most dangerous enemy continued to colour how this new Roman city was portrayed by Roman and Greek authors. As well as highlighting the ongoing influence of Carthage as an anti-type through which Romans writers could explore aspects of their political and cultural identities, such an approach also underlines the importance of physical landscapes as repositories of memory in Roman thought.

Ancient Cities: Athens, Gift of Athena

Tuesday 7 June, 2011

Dr Alastair Blanshard

The Greek historian Thucydides once tried to imagine a world where all memory of Athens had faded and only the ruins of the civilisation remained. What a grand impression future viewers would have of the city, he thought, and … how wrong they would be.

In this session, we will explore the myths that we tell about Athens. It will examine the legacy of Athenian culture. In particular, we will focus on looking at the darker side of that legacy. We like to imagine the Athenians as devoted to freedom and the spirit of reason. Certainly there is much to praise about Athens, but the city could also be violent, irrational, xenophobic, misogynist, and brutally imperialist. This session is devoted to exploring both sides of the Athenian story.

Ancient Cities:The city of Rome: From caput mundi to mirror of princes and beyond

21 June, 2011

Dr Paul Roche

This lecture will trace both the urban development of the city of Rome and some of the ways ancient Romans thought about their city from the period of late republic (second century BC) to the early empire (first century AD). This was a period of radical change, which saw the physical transformation of the city from something of a diplomatic embarrassment to the glittering capital of a Mediterranean world empire (‘beggaring description and never again to be imitated by mortal men’ as a late eye-witness puts it). This metamorphoses was accompanied by a shift in the way urban development itself was conceived, from a concept with limited horizons beyond the unit of the building itself to a more explicit concern with moving people through larger, consolidated units of urban space. Rome’s topography was intrinsic to her politics, culture, religion and self-definition; a theme tracked in this lecture is how the city offered itself as a metaphor or a mirror: of family (self-) esteem, of world empire, of the emperor’s image and his care for his people, and of the care for the individual human soul.

Enquiries to salon@sydney.edu.au

Humanities Salon in the news and on Late Night Live

The Humanities Salon / Sydney Ideas Open event The Politics of Surveillance Narratives: From Creative Visions to Experiential Reflections will be highlighted on tonight’s ABC Radio National program, Late Night Live (Monday 9 May 2011).

Late Night Live is hosted by Phillip Adams, and is broadcast Mon-Thur 10pm, and repeated 4pm the following day (6pm WA). The programs are also available for podscast.

It has also featured a mention on the University’s home page, with a feature story which asks of surveillance:

Is it the stuff of nightmare or a necessary part of routine life – something without which modern civilisation could barely function?

The Salon will feature Dr Peter Marks, Department of English, and Dr Gavin Smith Department of Sociology and Social Policy.

Date: 10 May 2011
Venue: Sydney Law School foyer, Eastern Avenue, Camperdown Campus.
Time: 6.00pm to 7.30pm

NOTE: You can now listen or download from Radio National

Humanities Salon event — The Politics of Surveillance Narratives: From Creative Visions to Experiential Reflections

10 May, 2011
Dr Peter Marks, Department of English, and Dr Gavin Smith Department of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Sydney

Surveillance constitutes one of contemporary society’s most pressing and perplexing concerns, but our responses to it and our understanding of it can be haphazard and ill-informed. Is it the stuff of Orwellian nightmare, or a necessary and enabling part of routine life, something without which modern civilization could barely function? This presentation provides both fictional and factual perspectives, opening up discussion on the past, present and future of surveillance. Peter Marks traces the creative representation of surveillance in literary and cinematic utopias and dystopias, exploring how these speculations offer illuminating ways of thinking about the political and moral questions and possibilities that surveillance compels us to confront. Gavin Smith considers the lived experience of surveillance as articulated by those workers entrenched in the everyday mechanics of surveillance operation. The banal and trying nature of this distinctive form of labour offers a layer of complexity to both fictional and non-fictional accounts of surveillance, and adds a politics of exploitation and alienation to conventional (simplistic) understandings of surveillance as consolidating either dystopic or utopic power.

Venue: Sydney Law School foyer, Eastern Avenue, Camperdown Campus.
Time: 6.00pm to 7.30pm

Cities – Shanghai: Colonialism, Cosmopolitanism and Chinese Modernity

Please note this event has been rescheduled

New date: Thursday 30 September, 2010

Researchers of this panel will present the city of Shanghai to the audience as they know of it from various perspectives. Professor David Goodman will give an introduction to the history, ethnography and the pre-1949 colonial conditions of Shanghai. Dr Yiyan Wang will demonstrate how Shanghai’s cosmopolitan environment in the 1920s and 1930s was conducive to the emergence of Chinese modernism in literature and art.  Dr Yi Zheng will examine how city narratives, from travel guides to fiction to personal memoirs, as an important part of urban culture, shape and structure our knowing, feeling and understanding of the cityscape, its inhabitants and history. She will focus in particular on how Shanghai stories function as the romance of a bourgeois city.

Dr Yiyan Wang and Dr Yi Zheng — both from the School of Languages and Cultures — will be in conversation with Professor David Goodman, Director, Institute of Social Sciences
Venue: Sydney Law School foyer, Eastern Avenue, Camperdown Campus.
Time: 6.00pm to 7.30pm

A joint Sydney Humanities Salon and Sydney Ideas Open event.

History Week: 4-12 September, 2010

The theme for History Council of New South Wales’ History Week 2010 is ‘Faces in the Street’. Staff from the Department of History will be presenting a series of fascinating talks during this year’s History Week.

Furious Faces on the Streets: Public Protests in history
Prof Robert Aldrich, Dr Frances Clarke and Dr Jim Masselos

“Power concedes nothing without a demand,” avowed Frederick Douglass in 1857, “It never did and it never will.” As an escaped slave who had gone on to become a leading figure in America’s growing abolitionist movement, Douglas was no stranger to making public demands. He would become one of the many millions of people in history–most of them now forgotten–who refused to submit quietly in the face of authority. Their public actions have been one of history’s driving forces. In protests, marches, parades and rallies, ordinary people have demanded and produced social change, sometimes, but not always, for the good. In this panel, we examine the history of public protests in a range of contexts–from crowd action in post-Enlightenment Europe and America through to the nationalist struggles in India and beyond–examining their contexts, tactics, and historical impact.
When: Monday 6 September 2010, 6:00pm – 7:30pm.
Where: Centre for Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia (CCANESA), Room 409 Madsen Building F09, University of Sydney

Faces from Australia’s Underworld
Penny Russell (Sydney):
‘Street Parade: of a prostitute, a military captain and a sword’
Amanda Kaladelfos (Sydney):
‘The Execution of Frank Johns, Bushranger’
Jill Matthews (ANU):
‘Blue Movies and their Audiences’
Presented by the Department of History and the Nicholson Museum at the University of Sydney
Australia’s Underworld’, a new unit offered by the History Department at the University of Sydney in 2010, encourages students to explore Australia’s forgotten stories: the cross-dressers and prostitutes, crooks and impostors, maverick reformers, entertainers and oddballs who find little place in the ‘national story’, but whose lives are stitched into the fabric of our past. How do historians frame questions to capture the richness of social experience? What sources and research techniques do they employ? Poster displays show how Sydney’s newest historians go about the task, and a panel of historians from Sydney and ANU share their latest discoveries.

Enjoy a drink and light refreshments while viewing students’ poster presentations of their research projects, followed by a panel on facets of ‘underworld’ history.

When: Tuesday 7 September 2010, 6:00pm – 7:30pm
Where: Nicholson Museum, Main Quadrangle, University of Sydney
Contact: 9351 2812, craig.barker@sydney.edu.au
Note: Free. Bookings essential.

Heroic Culture: E. P. Thompson’s Histories and the Experience of the Oppressed
Dr Chris Hilliard

Putting names to the faces in the street, recapturing the experiences and struggles of the forgotten people of the industrial revolution, was a central preoccupation of the eminent British historian E. P. Thompson (1924-1993). In this lecture, Dr Chris Hilliard of the University of Sydney explores the power and limitations Thompson’s brand of history and takes stock of his legacy.
When: Wednesday 8 September 2010, 6:00pm – 7:30pm.
Where
: Law Lecture Theatre 101, Sydney Law School, University of Sydney.

Cities – Sydney, Freetown and Cape Town: Convicts and Empire
Dr Kirsten McKenzie, Dr Emma Christopher

Many Sydneysiders think they know all about the history of their city, but few know that its convict past links it firmly to Africa, a continent many Australians know little about. Emma Christopher and Kirsten McKenzie uncover a forgotten history of abandoned plans and lost hopes, of political objections to sending convicts to Africa and the sufferings of those who were sent there. By revealing the convict connections to Freetown, Sierra Leone and Cape Town, South Africa, they show how very nearly the stories of Africa and Australia came to taking different turns. The salon will launch Emma’s new book A Merciless Place: The Lost Story of Britain’s Convict Disaster in Africa and How it Led to the Settlement of Australia.
When: Thursday 9 September 2010, 6:00pm – 7:30pm.
Where: Sydney Law School Foyer, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney.

These events are free, Bookings required for Tuesday’s event only.
Proudly supported by The Department of History, The Humanites Salon, The School of Philosophical and Historical Inquiry, and Sydney Ideas at the University of Sydney

For general information contact
T +61 2 9351 2862
F +61 2 9351 3918
E sophi.enquiries@sydney.edu.au

For more information on History Week please visit the History Council of NSW

Workshop with Ken Wissoker, Editorial Director of Duke University Press

We are now calling for expressions of interest in a workshop on how to get published by U.S. academic presses on Friday, 20 August 2010. Ken Wissoker, the editorial director of Duke University Press, will conduct the workshop, which includes practical advice on writing proposals, the review process, and manuscript preparation, as well as more general discussion of the state of scholarly publishing. In the past fifteen years, Duke University Press has developed a reputation for innovative and sometimes courageous publication in the humanities and social sciences.

The workshop will take place between 10.30 and 12, followed by a light lunch. Numbers are limited. If you want to participate, please contact Professor Warwick Anderson (warwick.anderson@sydney.edu.au) before July 23. Preference will be given to junior academic staff and advanced post-graduate students (the latter nominated by their supervisor). A few individual appointments with Ken Wissoker are also available on the afternoon of August 20 for intensive discussion of book projects.

On the evening of Thursday, 19 August, Ken Wissoker will take part in a SOPHI Humanities Salon, discussing more generally the current condition and future of scholarly publishing. The salon will be open to the public.

The visit of Ken Wissoker is sponsored by the Institute of Social Sciences, the Faculty of Arts, and the School of Philosophical and Historical Inquiry at the University of Sydney.


Pages

Archives